Alceu Valença reaches boiling point by recycling frevos, cirandas and maracatu in a vibrant carnival album

Alceu Valença reaches boiling point by recycling frevos, cirandas and maracatu in a vibrant carnival album

With a warm sound, the album ‘Bicho Crazy Beauty – É Carnaval’ re-presents the artist’s revelry repertoire in new recordings made with Almério, Geraldo Azevedo, Ivete Sangalo, Lenine and Maria Bethânia. Cover of the album ‘Bicho Crazy Beauty – É Carnaval’, by Alceu Valença with guests Disclosure Album review Title: Bicho Crazy Beauty – É Carnaval Artist: Alceu Valença with Almério, Elba Ramalho, Geraldo Azevedo, Ivete Sangalo, Juba, Lenine, Lia by Itamaracá and Maria Bethânia Edition: Deck Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ♪ It’s difficult to reach the ideal boiling point to make frevo ignite revelers in the streets and at Carnival balls. Alceu Valença reaches this point and maintains it throughout the ten tracks on the album Bicho Crazy Beauty – É Carnaval. A reference artist in the carnival fervor of Olinda (PE) and Recife (PE), capitals of Pernambuco, the state where he came into the world in the interior of São Bento do Una (PE) on July 1, 1946, the singer and composer from Pernambuco recycles frevos, cirandas and maracatu with eight guests on this incendiary album recorded with musical production by Tovinho and masterfully mixed and mastered. The heat of the brass blown into the coals by Enok Chagas (trumpet), Fabinho Costa (trumpet), Gilberto Pontes (saxophone), Marcone Tulio (trombone) and Nilsinho Amarante (trombone) is impressive on the album. In the album Bicho Crazy Beauty – É Carnaval, these incandescent metals are combined with the rocking fury of Zi Ferreira’s guitar, a musician who shows that he learned the lesson of the master Paulo Rafael (July 11, 1955 – August 23, 2021), an instrumentalist from Pernambuco which injected electricity into Alceu’s sound from 1975 onwards. Bicho Crazy Beauty is an album with a warm, vibrant sound, so full of energy that even the lack of carnival vocation in Maria Bethânia’s singing dissipates in the strength of the frevo-song approach De January to January (2002), re-recorded by Alceu with the performer who gave visibility on the album A Beira e o Mar (1984) to a song, Na Primeira Morning (1980), which Alceu had discreetly released four years ago. Bicho Crazy Beauty is a cohesive album, but it is fair to highlight the intoxicating recording of the title song – presented by Alceu on the album Sete DESIRES (1992) in a forró atmosphere – in the agile cadence of frevo in a recording made with the help of Ivete Sangalo. Alceu and Ivete cross the Pernambuco-Bahia bridge with an electric brake that follows the trio without losing the pulse of Olinda. With Lenine, one of the kings of northeastern pop swing, Alceu is in tune with the swing of Bom Too much (1985), a frevo by José Michiles da Silva, an octogenarian composer celebrated in Pernambuco with the artistic name of J. Michiles. Another frevo by Michiles, Diabo louro (1994) sparks the recording made by Alceu with his son Juba. And speaking of energy, Elba Ramalho from Paraíba reiterates her revelry vocation by following Caia’s sinuous step over me (Alceu Valença and Don Tronxo, 2006) in a duo with the host from Pernambuco. With his fellow countryman Almério, Alceu elevates O Homem da Midnight (1975) – Alceu’s partnership with Carlos Fernando (1937 – 2013), to whom the album is dedicated – in the Carnival crowd like a giant doll with a wooden block leg from Olinda (PE). In Maracatu (Alceu Valença on verses by the poet Ascenso Ferreira, 1982), a track without guests (scheduling issues made Seu Jorge’s participation unfeasible), the baticum gains emphasis in an arrangement that maintains the album’s electricity while shedding light on a beautiful composition that deserves stay in the spotlight. In the beach sequence, Cássio Cunha’s drums seem to hit the waters of the sea when Alceu strings together three circuses – Lia (Manoel José and Antonio Baracho), flirtatious Moça (Lia de Itamaracá) and Janaína (Lia de Itamaracá) were the ones who gave it to me – in a duet with Lia de Itamaracá, queen of this musical genre already incorporated into the Pernambuco Carnival. Still on Praia da Ciranda, Alceu illuminates Luar de Prata (2006) and the fine seam of the album in a recording inspired by Heleno Feitosa’s trumpet solo. By the way, the chaining of the ten tracks on Bicho Crazy Beauty contributes to the perfection of the album, building a narrative that leads to the frevo led by Táxi lunar (Alceu Valença, Geraldo Azevedo and Zé Ramalho, 1979) at the high rhythmic speed that joins Alceu with the fellow countryman Geraldo Azevedo, partner in creating the song, a mandatory hit in both shows. Finally, with the release of the album Bicho Crazy Beauty – É Carnaval on January 26th, Alceu Valença proves, once again, that it is possible to make a great album with old repertoire and new flavors due to the way the songs are re-recorded and realigned. . The festivities are irresistible! With mastery,. Alceu Valença chains 13 songs in the 10 tracks of the album ‘Bicho Crazy Beauty – É Carnaval’ Leo Aversa / Disclosure



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