Scientists use artificial intelligence to read parchments charred about 2,000 years ago

Scientists use artificial intelligence to read parchments charred about 2,000 years ago

Material was damaged after a volcanic eruption in the ancient city of Herculaneum, Italy. The researchers were able to decipher the content using technology and won the Vesuvius 2023 Challenge. Writings brought reflections on music, food and the pleasures of life. Scientists use artificial intelligence to read parchments charred around 2,000 years ago. Disclosure/Vesuvius Challenge Young scientists Youssef Nader, Luke Farritor and Julian Schilliger were awarded in the Vesuvius Challenge after using artificial intelligence (AI) to decipher passages from charred Herculaneum parchments around 2,000 years ago. The Vesuvius Challenge (or Vesuvius Challenge) was created in 2023 to promote studies and discoveries about records in the Herculaneum scrolls. According to the Deutsche Welle (DW) agency, these materials were in a library in the ancient city of Herculaneum, in Italy, and were damaged after a volcanic eruption. Stored today in the library in Naples, also in Italy, the approximately 800 burned parchments cannot be opened, as there is a risk of breaking them. AI managed to decipher materials In the mid-1800s, they were found by a local farmer. For a long time, several people tried to decipher these papyrus scrolls, but without success. The three scientists explained that they used CT scans to scan the papyrus, flattening the material to detect ink on the page with the help of AI and machine learning models. The technology used, however, was not trained to identify ancient Greek letters. But by collecting the records captured by the computed tomography, the AI ​​combined each stain and reconstructed the letters, generating the writings, according to DW. Scrolls Disclosure/Vesuvius Challenge According to the Vesuvius Challenge, so far, it has been possible to unroll and read around 5% of the first scroll. “Our team worked hard and obtained a preliminary transcript of all the columns revealed,” he revealed. The first analyzes reveal that the parchments brought reflections on music, food and the pleasures of life. “It’s very gratifying to know that these things are available and that we now have a mechanism to read them and that this will create a whole field of study and analysis for classicists,” said Brent Seales, professor of computer science and co-creator of the Vesuvius Challenge. , in an interview with American CNN. “By 2024, our goal is to go from 5% of one scroll to 90% of all four scrolls we digitize and lay the groundwork to read all 800,” Vesuvius Challenge said in a statement. READ ALSO: Meta will identify images created by AI on Facebook, Instagram and Threads What the brain chip implanted by Elon Musk’s company in a person looks like Biohacking: how and why human beings are implanting chips in their own bodies Xiaomi presents its first in China electric car Xiaomi presents its first electric car in China New York carries out first tests with “flying cars” New York carries out first tests with “flying cars” Would you eat this 3D printed dessert? Would you eat this 3D printed dessert?



Source link